14 October 2019
RSS Facebook Twitter Linkedin Digg Yahoo Delicious
Web Master

Web Master

Thursday, 13 December 2018 10:05

Public Lecture Invitation

Sudanese National Academy of Sciences (SNAS) with the Organization for Women in Science in the Developing world (OWSD) are developing approaches for the incorporation of nanotechnology in the science and engineering education in the Sudan. Host academy lead by: Prof. Mohamad H A Hassan, is pleased to invite you to the public seminar titled Science, Engineering and Nanotechnology: Experiences in Academia and Government" by the Diaspora Fellow: Prof. Osama O. Awadelkarim, Pennsylvania State University, USA; Fellow, Sudanese National Academy of Sciences.

Wednesday, 05 December 2018 08:21

Hassan named to the Pontifical Academy

For a career of accomplishments in research and international cooperation, TWAS founding Executive Director Mohamed Hassan has been elected a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.

Mohamed H.A. Hassan, the president of the Sudanese National Academy of Sciences and former executive director of The World Academy of Sciences, has been appointed by Pope Francis to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.  

Mohamed H.A. HassanHassan, chairman of the Governing Council of the United Nations Technology Bank for the Least Developed Countries, was notified of this lifetime appointment by Bishop Marcelo Sánchez Sorondo, chancellor of the Academy. He will receive the insignia in an official induction ceremony, which will be celebrated during a solemn pontifical audience at a meeting of the Academy 12-14 November in Rome, Italy. 

The Pontifical Academy is one of the world's oldest and most august scientific bodies, with roots dating to the early 17th century. Under Academy statutes, members receive lifetime appointments "on the basis of their eminent original scientific studies and of their acknowledged moral personality, without any ethnical or religious discrimination."

"I am humbled and privileged to be appointed a member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, one of the world's most prestigious academies," Hassan said. "I look forward to joining the Academy's 80 international members and contributing to the fulfilment of its mission – the advance of knowledge in science and in related ethical and philosophical issues."

Hassan served as TWAS's first executive director, a position he held from 1983-2011. During that period, he guided the Academy through a period of great growth and expanding influence. In the global scientific community, he has a reputation as an ambassador for scientific excellence and international science cooperation. 

Using his experience and diplomatic skills, Hassan has been an advocate of scientific advancement for the developing world, and a driving force in establishing South-South and South-North partnerships for sustainable development. He has also fostered the organization of science diplomacy events, bringing together scientists and policymakers to address the challenges of poverty, scientific development and gender equality.

With a PhD in mathematics from the University of Oxford (UK), Hassan's scientific contributions range from theoretical plasma physics to the development of mathematical and physical models in environmental, geoscience and space science. He has also authored articles on science, technology and innovation in the developing world. In addition to his leadership at the Sudanese National Academy of Sciences, Hassan currently he is a professor of mathematics at Khartoum University and chairman of the Board of Trustees of Al Mashreq University, both in Sudan.

He formerly served as president of the African Academy of Sciences and is a current member of several merit-based international academies. In 2012 he received the Abdus Salam Medal, named after TWAS founder Abdus Salam, the Pakistani physicist and Nobel Prize winner. 

Indeed, the election of Hassan to the Pontifical Academy has important symbolic significance. It was at a meeting of the Academy in 1981 that Salam and other scholars conceived of an academy of sciences for the developing world – and from that idea, TWAS was born in 1983. Salam was a member before his death in 1996.

The Pontifical Academy (Pontificia Academia Scientiarum in Latin) is an international and independent body with roots that date back to the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei (Academy of the Lynxes), an esteemed scientific body founded in Rome (1603). 

Today the Academy's goals are focused on promoting the progress of mathematical, physical and natural sciences, fostering interaction between faith and reason and offering authoritative advice on scientific and technological matters. Academy statutes limit membership to 80 elite academicians, all serving lifetime terms. They represent all the principal branches of science and all regions of the world. 

The academicians are expected to attend Academy meetings, and to suggest topics for study. They help to select new members, and also to nominate exceptional early career scientists for the Pius XI Medal.

The Pontifical Academy is a member of the InterAcademy Partnership (IAP), which is hosted by TWAS in Trieste, Italy, and of the International Science Council (ICSU).

Cristina Serra

Tuesday, 27 November 2018 14:40

Hassan receives science diplomacy award

TWAS interim executive director Mohamed H.A. Hassan has been honoured for a career of extraordinary impact in creating international bonds through science and diplomacy.

 TWAS founding Executive Director Mohamed H.A. Hassan received one of seven Science Forum South Africa 2016 Science Diplomacy Awards today in recognition of his career achievements in using science to fostering international cooperation and friendship.

The award was announced Friday by South African Minister of Science and Technology Naledi Pandor during the closing ceremony of the annual Science Forum South Africa in Pretoria, South Africa.

 "I am sincerely grateful and humbled to receive this award from my colleagues in South Africa," Hassan said. "Of course such an honour would be impossible without partners, because partnerships are the essence of diplomacy. And so I count myself lucky for the many committed and very capable colleagues I have worked with over the years – they have been co-authors of everything that we have achieved."

 Hassan was an early-career Sudanese mathematician when TWAS Founder Abdus Salam, a Nobel-winning Pakistani physicist, recruited him to come to the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy. In 1983, Salam asked him to help run the campaign that would bring TWAS – originally the Third World Academy of Sciences – to life. This was an ambitious idea, especially then, because it was still the era of the Cold War, and few global political leaders recognized how science, technology and engineering could be crucial to the advancement of developing nations.

 Hassan soon became TWAS's founding executive director, and he dedicated himself to building the Academy from the ground up. Across more than a quarter-century, he used his experience and diplomatic skill to build global networks that helped establish the foundations for scientific research throughout the developing world. He was instrumental in organisations and events that brought together scientists and policymakers from the South. And he was a leading figure in bringing the InterAcademy Partnership to Trieste, where it serves as a unified voice of some 130 global science and medical academies.

 He also maintained constructive relationships with the government of Italy and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), which have provided key funding to the Academy and its programmes.

 After retiring as executive director in 2011, Hassan continued to serve as TWAS treasurer until the end of 2015. He is currently the interim director of the Academy during a period of leadership transition. He also serves as president of IAP and president of the Sudanese National Academy of Sciences. He formerly served as chairman of the Council of the United Nations University and as president of African Academy of Sciences.

 Science Forum South Africa is a public science event organised by the nation's Department of Science and Technology to promote conversations about science – in South Africa, Africa and globally. This is the second year the event has been held, and also the second year of the science diplomacy awards.

  

Sean Treacy

 The Link of twas : http://twas.org/article/hassan-receives-science-diplomacy-award

sample

We are now accepting applications - click here for full conditions and online application form

Purpose of small grants

To enable early career researchers and global health professionals in the field of tropical medicine or global health to undertake clinical or scientific research or fieldwork, as stand-alone projects or distinct elements within a larger project.

Small grant value and timescale

The maximum RSTMH small grant awarded is £5,000 (including VAT).

Timetable

Applications for small grants open on Friday 2 February 2018 and close on Monday 2 April at 12:00 GMT, with disbursements from June 2018.

Small grant permitted use

Small grants can be used for the following expenditure:

  • Travel
  • Accommodation
  • Consumables
  • Field expenses, including salaries or per diems
  • Field transport
  • Items of equipment or software

Thematic priorities

Applications focused on the thematic areas listed in RSTMH’s five-year strategy will be prioritised. These are listed below:

  • Neglected tropical diseases, with a particular focus on their overlap with non-communicable diseases and the Sustainable Development Goals
  • Malaria, with a particular focus on drug resistance
  • One Health and wider planetary health. The consideration of human health alongside animal health, and the environment, in the context of social, economic and political factors
  • Topical issues including, but not limited to, emerging diseases
  • Drug resistant infections

We are now accepting applications - click here for full conditions and online application form

Download the conditions [PDF]

 

sample

The Conference will be jointly organized by the Sudanese National Academy of

Sciences (SNAS), the Sudan Academy of Young Scientists (SAYS) in partnership with the TWAS Regional Office for Sub-Saharan Africa (TWAS-ROSSA).

It will be held in Khartoum and in the vicinity of the Sudanese ancient city of Meroe.

 The conference will bring together a group of talented young African scientists to present their latest research activities in the rapidly advancing field of Genomics.

A number of world-renowned scientists in Genomic Science will be invited to give plenary lectures and participate in various discussions.

The Conference is intended to provide an opportunity for forging links and sharing experiences across geographical, political and social boundaries, for providing continuity and communication between senior and young scientists and between disciplines, and for bridging the gap between research and implementation.

 

25 March to 19 April 2019 in Bagamoyo, Tanzania

Registrations are now open (until 15 January 2019)

 

The 5th edition of the Malaria Course with a Focus on E-Learning will take place from 25 March to 19 April 2019 in Bagamoyo, Tanzania. The course is offered by Swiss TPH in collaboration with the Ifakara Health Institute (IHI), Bagamoyo Branch and its duration is 4 weeks.

 

The objectives of the course are to reinforce knowledge and expertise in malaria and to develop competence in self- and e-learning. At the end of the course, the participants should be able to manage malaria issues more effectively and to develop basic training courses and material in their home institutions.

 

This course is designed for individuals involved in malaria research or malaria control and elimination (health personnel, scientists and researchers, public health specialists and malaria control administrators).

16 participants from malaria-affected countries will be selected according to their profile, professional status, letter of motivation and recommendations. The minimum requirement is a BSc or Master degree, several years of professional experience and basic computer skills.

 

More information can be found on the website: https://www.swisstph.ch/en/courses/mctz2019/

or by email to Dr Konstantina Boutsika at konstantina.boutsika@swisstph.ch  

Monday, 04 April 2011 11:54

LeBron Gets The First Laugh

sampleThat the hotly anticipated return of LeBron James to Cleveland on Thursday night ended in a dull, sour blowout makes a bleak kind of sense. LeBron and the Heat won the game handily, dispatching the overmatched Cavaliers 118-90, but it was tough to call it a victory, if only because of how queasily joyless it all felt. And as brilliant as LeBron himself was, putting up 38 points and eight assists over three jeer-packed quarters, he certainly didn’t seem to enjoy himself much in doing so. The Heat were impressive, LeBron was dazzling and yet the whole experience felt, in some broader sense, anticlimactic and notably un-triumphant. Wasn’t this supposed to be fun?

That the hotly anticipated return of LeBron James to Cleveland on Thursday night ended in a dull, sour blowout makes a bleak kind of sense. LeBron and the Heat won the game handily, dispatching the overmatched Cavaliers 118-90, but it was tough to call it a victory, if only because of how queasily joyless it all felt. And as brilliant as LeBron himself was, putting up 38 points and eight assists over three jeer-packed quarters, he certainly didn’t seem to enjoy himself much in doing so. The Heat were impressive, LeBron was dazzling and yet the whole experience felt, in some broader sense, anticlimactic and notably un-triumphant. Wasn’t this supposed to be fun?

Monday, 04 April 2011 10:18

Germans Query Terror Warning

samplePolice and intelligence officials said they are investigating the credibility of the informant and are concerned that al Qaeda operatives may be mounting a disinformation campaign to divert and weaken European counterterrorism efforts.

Before the informant's tip, German officials had played down similar tips supplied by two men arrested this year in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Those reports led the U.S. and others in October to issue warnings of possible attacks in some European cities—to the frustration of German officials, who declined to change their own security posture, arguing the intelligence was inadequate.

A spokesman for the German Interior Ministry declined to comment on details of the investigation, and said nothing has changed since Germany warned of a possible terrorist attack in mid-November. The warning was based on a recommendation made jointly by all of Germany's security services, the spokesman said.

Monday, 04 April 2011 10:16

Shadow Lending Hampers Beijing

sampleChina's government has traditionally used its control of the largely state-owned banking sector to regulate the country's pace of economic growth, directing it to pump out cheap credit in good times and restricting the volume of new loans to prevent overheating. But controlling credit has become more difficult as the financial system gets more sophisticated, analysts say, complicating Beijing's efforts to bring the economy in for a smooth landing in coming months.

China has a long history of gray-market financing flowing from small, informal and unregulated groups, to sectors not well covered by banks. A number of formally incorporated entities, including trust, leasing and guarantee companies, have also emerged, with the scope to provide alternative financing. As banks labor under stricter limitations on how they can lend, they have been looking to trust companies in particular to trim their balance sheets and lessen their regulatory burden.

In a report Thursday, Fitch Ratings estimated that China's banks already have blown past the 7.5 trillion yuan ($1.126 trillion) limit that regulators set on new local currency lending for this year and extended more than three trillion yuan in credit that hasn't been recorded on their balance sheets.

Monday, 04 April 2011 10:16

U.S. Sees Greater North Korea Threat

sampleThe IAEA already is investigating evidence that North Korea transferred a nearly operational nuclear reactor to Syria, which Israeli jets subsequently destroyed in 2007. U.S. and U.N. officials now worry Pyongyang could begin exporting its advanced centrifuge equipment to its military allies in Iran and Myanmar.

"A uranium enrichment capability in [North Korea] could bolster its pursuit of a weapons capability and increases our concerns about prospects for onward proliferation of fissile material and of sensitive technologies," Glyn Davies, the U.S. ambassador to the IAEA, told the agency's 35-member board Thursday.

Mr. Davies said the U.S. believes Pyongyang may have already developed uranium-enrichment facilities beyond the one site it showed a visiting American scientist, Siegried Hecker, last month.

These additional facilities would allow North Korea to significantly increase its numbers of atomic weapons, as well as their yield.

"It is likely that North Korea had been pursuing an enrichment capability long before the April 2009 date it now claims," Mr. Davies said. "If so, there is a clear likelihood that DPRK has built other uranium enrichment-related facilities in its territory."

Since North Korea made public its uranium-enrichment capability last month, the Obama administration has struggled to formulate a new policy toward leader Kim Jong Il's government. This has been compounded by the North Korean attack on a South Korean island on Nov. 23, which dramatically heightened tensions in Northeast Asia.

Page 1 of 3